Introductory Lesson for To Kill a Mockingbird Unit

Lesson I: Intro to prejudice and to To Kill a Mockingbird
Objectives: Students will be introduced to the theme of prejudice. They will reflect upon the concept of prejudice and view it in light of their own lives. Students will also be introduced through visual images to the history surrounding Lee's classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird." They will pull themes and ideas from these photos and express their impact through written work (haiku).Standards met:
  1. Make meaning through asking and responding to a variety of questions related to text
  2. Explain and analyze how the context of setting and point of view impact a literary text
  3. Write responses to literature that extend beyond the summary and support references to the text, other works, other authors, or personal knowledge
Materials: Dr. Seuss' The Sneetches; markers/construction paper/drawing utensils; a variety of pictures that accurately depict the deep South during the 1930's (pictures should emphasize Jim Crow Laws, Racial segregation, and The Great Depression); a few example haiku poems; teacher's model of the haiku poem students will be creating
Procedures:
  1. Introduce unit (Who has heard of prejudice? What do you think it means? Explain that we will be starting a lesson with the theme of prejudice in "To Kill a Mockingbird.")
  2. Read The Sneetches aloud to students asking them to respond to the text through drawing
  3. Think/pair/share to discuss responses to the picture book
  4. Introduce the concept of setting and how it impacts texts
  5. Show pictures from the south during the 1930's *students should take notes and record emotions while viewing photos
  6. Introduce the haiku and show several examples
  7. Model a haiku you have written that relates the theme of a chosen photo
  8. Students will then write their own poems using a photo of choice
Assessment: The assessment for this lesson is primarily informal and involves the teacher's observation that meaningful insights are being made (participation points can be given if necessary). The students' artwork created during the reading of The Sneetches along with each student's haiku will prove informative enough on whether a meaningful connection was made.

Daily Calendar for To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan

Day 1:
  • 10-minute free-write:
    • What does it mean to grow up?
    • How do you know when you have grown up?
  • Hand out book and ask opinions and thoughts on book
  • Explain relevancy of the book to real-life and its connection to civil rights
  • Explain the racism in the book and the use of the “n-word”
  • Ask essential questions and discuss briefly
  • Define the time schedule for the upcoming unit and the culminating activities
  • Begin the Anticipation Guide and have students turn it in as their exit pass at the end of class
Day 2:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Pick the statement that you most or least agree with on your Anticipation Guide and discuss it.
    • What is individuality?
  • Finish Anticipation Guide
  • Read Paul Laurence Dunbar’s The Haunted Oak poem and discuss the cultural relevance to the unit
  • Discuss Civil Rights and its importance to the book
  • Chapter 1 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Have students read Chapters 2-3 for homework and be ready to discuss
Day 3:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • What is your initial reaction after reading the first chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird?
    • You have been introduced to multiple characters in just the first chapter. Who you do you most relate to? Why?
  • Point out quote in chapter 3 and discuss its relevance
  • Walking in Someone Else’s Shoes Activity (This goes with a quote from Chapter 3. Students pick a shoe, create a fictional character to answer the questions on the handout, and create a story.)
  • If students are not complete with their story, they need to complete it for homework.

Day 4:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Have you ever stereotyped or judged someone because of the way they look? Have you been judged? How does it make you feel?
    • What kind of character do you think Boo Radley is? Why are the children so interested in him?
  • Have students turn in their Walking in Someone Else’s Shoes final draft paper
  • Chapters 4-6 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Silently begin reading chapters 7-8. If not complete by the end of class, read for homework.
Day 5:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Explain what kind of character Dill is. Do you think he is purposely dishonest? Why does he lie so much?
    • How does honesty play a role in someone’s character?
  • Chapters 9-11 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Today will end Part I of the book
  • ExitPass (for extra credit): What has been your favorite/most intriguing event of the first half of the book? Why?
Day 6:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Chapter 8 is full of exciting events. The fire at Ms. Maudie’s house leads to Scout’s first encounter with Boo Radley. Write a journal entry from Boo’s perspective about the fire and his perspective of the people around him.
    • We completed the first part of the book. Describe why you think Harper Lee ends the story with the death of Ms. Dubose. Did her death play an important role in the plot of the story? What did it teach Scout and Jem?
  • Mini-lesson about the elements of a newspaper (for a deeper understanding for the final project). This will include a PowerPoint presentation for students.
  • Explain the collage and hand out the rubric. Also, discuss the importance of the paper they have to write along with the collage.
  • Allow students in-class time to work on their collages.
Day 7:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Pick one of the characters and write a journal entry from their perspective.
    • How do the events in the story relate to your own life?
  • Chapters 12-13 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • If there is extra time, allow students to work on their collages and papers.
Day 8:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Why do you think Calpurnia wanted to bring the children to her church so badly? Did they learn anything from this experience?
    • What is justice? What does it mean to be just to others?
  • Collect students’ final drafts of their collages and papers.
  • Chapters 14-15 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Introduction to the Mapping Maycomb activity
Day 9:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Explain why you agree or disagree with Aunt Alexandra’s decions to dismiss Calpurnia.
    • Explain why you think time and place setting plays such an important role in a novel. What about for this novel in particular?
  • Divide the students into partners and begin the Mapping Maycomb Activity
  • Hand out the rubric and answer any questions.
  • Have students read Chapters 16-17 for homework and complete their summary log.
Day 10:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • We are introduced to Tom Robinson’s trial in Chapter 16. What do you think of the scenery, character setup, etc.?
    • Do you think Atticus is a good lawyer? Does he represent Tom Robinson well? Why?
  • Briefly discuss Chapters 16-17.
  • Chapters 18-19 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Allow students to work on the Mapping Maycomb Activity if extra time.
  • Be sure to mention that we are halfway through the unit and they need to start thinking about their final projects. Answer any questions that they have.
Day 11:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • How does racism play a role in this novel? Explain some of your experiences with racism.
    • Do you think Tom Robinson is telling the truth in his testimony? Why won’t the crowd believe him? Is this fair? Please discuss your reasons.
  • Have students turn in their final drawing for the Mapping Maycomb Activity.
  • Chapters 20-22 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Discuss the history of the Scottsboro Boys trial and introduce the scavenger hunt.
Day 12:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • We meet Mr. Dolphus Raymond at the beginning of Chapter 20 and he tells the children that he acts drunk as an explanation of his lifestyle, but it is really because he would rather spend time with the black people of the community. Do you agree with this? Why do you think he does this?
    • Discuss the verdict of the trial. Do you agree or disagree with this verdict? Why?
  • Mini-lesson on elements of an effective interview and question development (as a deeper understanding for the final project)
  • Dedicate time in the computer lab for students to complete their Scottsboro Boys online scavenger hunt. The worksheet will be due by the end of class.
Day 13:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • What are some of the issues discussed in the book that occurred during the Civil Rights in the 1930’s? Discuss your research for the CD project in terms of Civil Rights.
    • How do the events in the story relate to your own life?
  • Chapters 23-25 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • If there is extra time, allow students to work on their CD projects.
Day 14:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Do you think that one’s individuality affects their amount of courage? How? Why?
    • Discuss Maycomb’s reaction to Tom Robinson’s death. What was your reaction? Do you agree or disagree with the occurrences? Why?
  • Chapters 26-27 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • If students have extra time, have them work on their list of songs for the CD project.
Day 15:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Another school year begins and the children seem to be growing up. Explain some of the changes that Scout and Jem have gone through since the beginning of the novel.
    • How do music, television, radio, and other media portray the events in society? Do these medium affect the changes in a society?
  • Chapters 28-29 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • Character Quest Handout (if not complete in class, complete as homework)
Day 16:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Who do you think killed Bob Ewell? Why would someone do this? Was it justified by the events in Chapter 28?
    • From Scout’s perspective, write a journal entry about the night of her attack.
  • Gather Character Quest Handout and briefly discuss the answers.
  • Chapters 30-31 Read Aloud/Follow Along (While reading, fill out chapter summary and response log answer sheet; be ready to discuss.)
  • We will complete the book today.
  • Work on Anticipation Guides for after reading.
  • ExitPass (for extra credit): What was your favorite part about Part II of the book? Why?
Day 17:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • How does a person’s perception affect their view of reality? Could this perception turn them into a liar? Explain.
    • Explain the importance of the reiteration of the quote in Chapter 31 about walking in someone else’s shoes.Why do you think Harper Lee wrote this same quote twice in one book? Do you really think it is that important?
  • If not already complete, allow time for discussion about the Anticipation Guide for after reading. Discuss the changes in opinions and reasons for these changes.
  • Allow time in the computer lab to research for their CD project or final projects.
Day 18:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Now that we have finished the book, pick one of the characters and discuss how he/she changed throughout the course of the novel.
    • Discuss the importance of the mockingbird in the story. Explain in great detail the meaning behind the title.
  • CD Project is due by the end of class today.
  • ReadWriteThink lesson plan: Profiles in Courage (adapted)
Day 19:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • We see the events in the story from Scout’s perspective. Pick a key event in the novel and write it from the perspective of another character. Be sure to use specific examples and changes in perspective.
    • Explain how the southern setting played a role in the events and themes present throughout the novel.
  • All final projects are due today.
  • Presentations over final projects (2 minutes per student)
  • Students fill out an exit pass about student presentations: Whose was your favorite presentation? Why?
Day 20:
  • 10-minute free-write
    • Who was your favorite character in the book? Why?
    • Name one lesson that you learned throughout the events of the book. How does this lesson apply to your life?
  • Class discussion over the essential question (will take about 10-15 minutes).
  • Students will have the rest of class time to write their in-class essay about the essential question of the novel. It will be due by the end of class. They will need to make a strong connection to the novel through this paper and really express what they learned through the unit. It is a paper about their metacognition.

Although this is a rigid calendar, the dates are subject to change to meet the needs of the students. If due dates change, students will be given plenty of notice.


|| Activity
Points Possible
Scoring Guide
Due Date
Personal Journals
100 (3 5-point extra credit exit passes)
Completion/Self-Assessment
Every Friday
Chapter Summary/Log
155
Completion
Every Friday
Anticipation Guide
10
Completion/Self-Assessment
Day 2
Walking in Someone Else’s Shoes
25
Rubric
Day 4
Collage and Paper
50
Rubric
Day 8
Mapping Maycomb
50
Rubric
Day 11
Scottsboro Boys Scavenger Hunt
25
Completion
Day 12
Character Quest
15
Completion
Day 16
CD Activity
60 (15 extra credit points possible)
Rubric
Day 18
Final Out-of-Class Assignment
100
Rubric
Day 19
Final In-Class Essay
30
6+1 Traits/Self-Assessment
Day 20
Total Points
620 (30 extra credit points possible)




Weekly Vocabulary:
http://www.vocabahead.com/StudyRoom/tabid/61/Default.aspx


Monster Schedule

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
7
Intro; syllabus; rules & procedures
8
Assign books; author background
knowledge; biopoem of self

9
Receive Assignment #1

Characterization (biopoem of main
character)
10
Due today: Assignment #1:
pages 1-43

Receive Assignment #2

11
Research in library;
Monster webquest
14
15
Due today: Assignment #2:
pages 44-88
16
Receive Assignment #3

17
Focus: universality, analogy, and
colloquialism
18
Due today: Assignment #3:
pages 89-126
Receive Assignment #4

21
Due today: Assignment #4:
pages 127-159
22
23
Receive Assignment #5

24
25
Due today: Assignment #5:
pages 161-200
Receive Assignment #6
28
Due today: Assignment #6:
pages 200-238
Receive Assignment #7
29
30
Due today: Assignment #7 :
pages 238-end of book
31
Review for test
February 1st
Final test over novel

Begin To Kill a Mockingbird
Be sure to bring you book to class EVERY DAY! Also, assignments are due on the specified due date at the BEGINNING of class that day. No exceptions!
Due dates are subject to change at teacher’s discretion.
http://vadelmage.wikispaces.com/file/view/Eng9_Grammar_Summary_Parts_of_Speech.pdf/276322200/Eng9_Grammar_Summary_Parts_of_Speech.pdf