English III: Weekly Lesson Plans
Week of: Sept 24-28

Teacher: Stafford

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Higher Order Questions:
What is Poe’s singular effect? What is an unreliable narrator, and how does Poe achieve such in his short stories?
Higher Order Questions:
What characteristics of Transcendentalism continue to flourish in our world today?
Higher Order Questions:
What ideas do Thoreau, Gandhi, and King share about civil disobedience? How are they different in their theories?
Higher Order Questions:
What is “non-violent resistance”? What is civil disobedience?
Higher Order Questions:
What would Thoreau say about your life?
What would he say about New York’s law which outlaws 32 ounce sodas?
Standard(s)/ Objectives/ Indicators:
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)
CC11.RL.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
Standard(s)/ Objectives/ Indicators:
CC11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CC11.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
Standard(s)/ Objectives/ Indicators:
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant. (e.g.in today’s lesson: Thoreau’s discussion about ants fighting in relation to his views about war, Thoreau’s excerpt about beans in relation to his feelings about nature and hard work, etc.)
Standard(s)/ Objectives/ Indicators:
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC.11.L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Standard(s)/ Objectives/ Indicators:
CC.11.RIT.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
CC.11.L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Bell Ringer:
Poetry Analysis: Read and analyze “Because I Could Not Stop For Death” by Emily Dickinson
Bell Ringer:
Respond to the following prompt:
If you had to choose a place to live for two years where you would be without friends or family, where would you choose to build your house? Why would you choose to live there?
Bell Ringer:
Respond to the following prompt:
Describe a time when you were inspired by or in “awe” of nature (the night sky, the ocean, the mountains, etc.). What inspired you?
Bell Ringer:
Poetry Analysis: Read and analyze Emily Dickinson’s “I Heard a Fly Buzz”
Bell Ringer:
Respond to the following prompt: What would you do if you knew for sure that you were going to die?
Vocabulary: Write definitions and parts of speech for this week’s 10 vocab. words.
Vocabulary: Determine synonyms for each vocab. word.
Vocabulary: Determine antonyms for each vocab. word.
Vocabulary: Use each vocab. word in a sentence.
Vocabulary: Assessment
Direct Instruction:
Students will turn in Usher analysis questions. They will then choose one of the five interpretations of the story and find textual evidence to support their chosen theory. Students will work in pairs to find the textual evidence. However, they will write essays individually and include the textual evidence in their essays.
Direct Instruction:
Brief discussion about homework.
Students will complete the “Transcendentalism Anticipation Guide” and discuss answers in whole class discussion format. Students will take notes from Transcendentalism PP.
In groups, students will pretend to be like Thoreau and "live deliberately" at Walden Pond for 26 months. They are only allowed to take 12 items with them. They must agree as a group as to what they will take and explain why. Also, the items must be grouped into at least three categories. Each group will present to the class their items, categories, and reasons for choosing each.
Direct Instruction:
Students will read Thoreau's “Walden” and interpret the text. For each section, students will complete a double entry response in which they paraphrase the text and them then respond to the text in a meaningful way (question the author's style or content, give a deeper interpretation of the text, explain it's historical significance, etc.)
Transcendentalism in the Woods activity (if time allows). Students will take a nature walk and, keeping Thoreau in mind, will analyze the simplicity of the natural world. Students will choose one minute piece of nature such as ants, leaves, blades of grass, etc, and write a brief essay describing it and its significance.
Direct Instruction:
1. Teacher will show the digital story Civil Disobedience to introduce students to the idea of civil disobedience.
2. Thoreau, Gandhi, and King’s ideas on civil disobedience have been excerpted into short,
manageable segments. Teachers need to facilitate reading comprehension, analysis, and
discussion of these excerpts. This will be accomplished by one or more of the following
tasks:
o Break students into small groups and ask them to read each excerpt together.
Encourage them to look up vocabulary and help them with words that they do not know. Ask students to discuss the meaning behind each excerpt. After this
discussion, they will write a summary of each excerpt’s meaning and significance.
o Students will read the excerpts individually and will summarize each excerpt’s main idea in their notebooks. Encourage them to look up vocabulary to help them with words that they do not know.
o The teacher will read each excerpt with students and discuss the meanings of each excerpt as a large class.
3. After students have read and discussed each excerpt, they should start to compare and contrast the different notions of civil disobedience. Students will approach this task in some
of the following ways:
o Students will make a Venn diagram on Civil Disobedience. In each circle, they will write the ideas that are specific to each author. In the areas that overlap,
students will list ideas that the authors share.
o Students will respond to a writing prompt like the one below:
*What ideas do Thoreau, Gandhi, and King share about civil disobedience? How are they different in their theories?
Direct Instruction:
Students turn in their Simplify, Simplify, Simplify assignments and teacher will briefly discuss in whole class discussion format about the journals.
Begin watching Stranger Than Fiction. Give discussion/analysis questions to keep students engaged while viewing film.
Indirect Instruction:
Teacher will walk around and assist students in finding textual evidence to support their chosen analysis of the text.
Indirect Instruction:
Teacher will walk around and assist individual groups in determining what twelve items they will choose and help them determine reasons for choosing each.
Indirect Instruction:
Teacher will walk around and assist students interpret the implied meaning presented in Thoreau’s “Walden”. During nature walk, teacher will make sure students are not talking and are reviewing the questions given as a focus point. She will remind them that they are to think like Thoreau.
Indirect Instruction:
Teacher will help students determine the purpose of each author’s work and help them find similarities in their viewpoints. She will also encourage students to relate the text to historical events during each author’s time period.
Indirect Instruction:
Teacher will walk around and ensure that students are actively engaged. She will continue to encourage students to think about what Thoreau would think and say about the main character’s mundane and routine driven life.
Differentiated Instruction:
Students may choose to find textual evidence to support each of the five interpretations and write a paragraph, including the evidence, for each. Another alternative may be for students to find three to five excerpts from the text to support one interpretation and write an essay response which includes each support in MLA format style.
Differentiated Instruction:
Rather than having a whole class discussion of the anticipation guide questions, students may be required to choose one that they feel strongly about and write a one paragraph response to be graded for development, usage, and syntax.
Students may complete the “Living in the Woods” assignments individually rather than as a group. They could then share their responses with their group and determine as a group which are of most important.
Differentiated Instruction:
Students may be given a picture of an outdoor setting rather than going outside.
Students may complete the “Walden” assignment in pairs rather than individually.
Differentiated Instruction:
Students may read the excerpts individually rather than in groups. Teacher may choose to analyze only two authors instead of three. Also, students may write a compare contrast essay after reading the excerpts.
Differentiated Instruction:
Students may write an essay titled “What Would Thoreau Say” instead of answering video questions. Rather than watching the film, students may spend class time writing a persuasive essay either defending or refuting Thoreau’s ideology.
Modifications:
Students may be given extra time to complete assignment as needed. Also, teacher may provide evidence from the text to support the five interpretations, and students will then determine which supports each interpretation.
Modifications:
Students may be given a guided note-taking handout to assist in power point notes.
Modifications:
Students may be given more time to complete the assignment.
Modifications:
Students may be given more time to complete the assignment.
Modifications:
Students may be given more time to complete the assignment.
Closure/Exit Slip:
What was Poe singular effect?
Closure/Exit Slip:
Write three sentences about Transcendentalism and include the following: Thoreau, nature, and violence.
Closure/Exit Slip:
What does it mean to “live deliberately”?
Closure/Exit Slip:
Summarize today’s lesson in three to five sentences and be sure to include Thoreau, King, and Gandhi.
Closure/Exit Slip:
What would Hendry David Thoreau say about Harold Crick’s mundane and routine driven life?
Assessment:
bell ringer, vocabulary, Usher questions, Usher analysis, exit slip
Assessment:
bell ringer, vocabulary, notes, simplicity journal, group activity, exit slip
Assessment:
bell ringer, vocabulary, “Walden” interpretation, exit slip
Assessment:
bell ringer, vocabulary, text interpretation, exit slip
Assessment:
bell ringer, vocabulary, Simplify journals, video questions, exit slip
Required Materials / Equipment:
Required Materials / Equipment:
Required Materials / Equipment:
Required Materials / Equipment:
Required Materials / Equipment:
Homework:
HW: Simplify, Simplify, Simplify (Due: Friday, 9/28/12) Keep a three-column log for four days. In the left-hand column, note the time. In the middle column, describe your behavior and environment at that time. In the right-hand column, describe what if anything Thoreau might recommend you modify in your behavior or environment to keep it simple. *You need to include at least 10 entries, with each entry consisting of a specific time, description of event, and 3-4 sentences describing how to modify your behavior.
Homework:
HW:Read and analyze Henry David Thoreau’s "On Civil Disobedience." (attached below)
Homework:
“Walden” interpretation (if not finished in class)
Simplify journal
Homework:
Simplify journal
Homework:
Simplify journal
Reflection/Notes:
Reflection/Notes:
Reflection/Notes:
Reflection/Notes:
Reflection/Notes: