1st Quarter: 2012



Date
Daily Lesson/Assignments
SPI(Student Performance Indicator)
Links

Week 1



Tues:
8/7/12
Lesson: 3x5 student info cards; 4x6
simile/metaphor activity
Students write a simile describing themselves, then turn that simile into
a metaphor. The students draw the
visuals for each of these on the back
side of the card. Using Think-Pair-Share,
students try to guess, after viewing the visuals, what the similes and metaphors are.
SPI 3003.7.1 Draw an inference from a non-print medium.

Wed:
8/8/12
NO SCHOOL; TEACHERS ONLY


Thurs:
8/9/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Vocabulary: Provide definitions and freyer model framework (SAT Vocab. 1)
Lesson: Rules & Procedures;
I Am From poem
Exit Slip: List three things you remember from today's class
SPI 3003.8.8 Analyze sound and metric devices (i.e., rhyme {internal, slant}, rhythm, blank verse, free verse, repetition, alliteration, onomatopoeia).


Fri:
8/10/12
Bell Ringer: Journal prompt
Vocabulary: synonyms & antonyms
Lesson: Hunger Games assessment essay questions; choose clock partners; choose novel for SSR (Sept 7th assessment);
Exit Slip: List 2 things that are still unclear and 1 thing you completely understand


Week 2


Mon:
8/13/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Vocabulary: Definitions for Lesson #1
Return pre-assessment exam
Lesson: PP on origin myths ; read
"Earth on Turtle's Back," "Navajo Origin Legend", & "When Grizzlies Walked Upright"; in groups, students create their own origin myths; SSR 10 min
Watch prior to lesson: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/
SPI 3003.2.6 Select the most appropriate strategies for participating productively in a team (e.g., contributing relevant and appropriate information that moves the team towards its goals; understanding the purpose of working as a team and working according to that purpose; assigning and developing roles and responsibilities for team members based on an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses and the dynamics of the team).



Tues:
8/14/12
Bell Ringer: Poetry Analysis
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Gallery walk of origin myths; answer HOT questions in reference to origin myths; students read feedback and respond;
open book test PH pg. 25-33
SPI 3003.3.5 Use a variety of strategies to combine a simple set of sentences into a longer, more complex sentence.

Wed:
8/15/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Intro to Puritanism (Holt Visual Connections: The Puritan Experience 5:52)

Read Bradstreet's "To My Dear and Loving Husband & "Upon the Burning of Our House"
Complete PH Unit 1 Vocab. Warm-Up (pgs. 88-89),
Reading Warm-Up (pgs. 90-91), Paraphrasing pg. 93, Interpretive Essay pg. 95
SSR 10 min.
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample.
SPI 3003.3.12
Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.

To My Dear and Loving Husband

Thurs:
8/16/12
Bell Ringer:Poetry Analysis
Vocabulary: Choose 10 vocabulary words and write a sentence for each.
Lesson: Read "An Iraqi Kid's Plea An Iraqi Kid's Plea
Discuss the differences among the following: Perpetrator, Victim, and Bystander.
Read "Half Hanged Mary" by Margaret Atwood and complete group poetry analysis questions.
SSR (15 minutes)
SPI 3003.5.1Make inferences and draw conclusions based on evidence in text.
SPI 3003.8.16
Analyze how form relates to meaning (e.g., compare a poem and a newspaper article on the same theme or topic).

An Iraqi Kid's Plea

Fri:
8/17/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Lesson: Vocabulary Assessment
Lesson:
Take notes:
Read "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" and analyze; MLA formatting of passage from reading and visual representation
SSR 10 min.

SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample.
SPI 3003.3.12
Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.
SPI 3003.3.13
Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.


Biography of Jonathan Edwards

Week 3


Mon:
8/20/12
Bell Ringer: Choose one of the following in which to respond and be prepared to discuss your response with the class:

Write about a time when...

ð You thought you might be in trouble and you lied to avoid it.
ð You were among a group of people who had trouble getting along. . . what were the underlying problems or motivations among them?
ð Rumors were flying . . . did someone try to dispel them?
ð Your emotions prevented you from making a good choice.
ð You found yourself "in over your head" because of a bad choice you made. You made a bad choice that you wish you could go back and change.
ð You made a good choice that played a role in who you are today.
Vocabulary: Lesson #2 Definitions
Lesson: The Crucible PP (take notes)
Complete The Crucible Anticipation Guide and discuss. Read "How to Spot a Witch" and discuss superstitions.
Discuss "scapegoats" in our country, world, school, etc.
Discuss "witchhunts" throughout history; watch Harold and Kumar clip (if accessible); begin reading Act I.
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample.
SPI 3003.8.11
Identify and analyze the elements of drama (i.e., stage directions, dialogue, soliloquy, monologue, aside).

Tues:
8/21/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar (confusing words)
Vocabulary: Synonyms
Lesson: Answer Act I review questions; view Act I of The Crucible and take notes
pertaining to essay
SPI 3003.1.6 Select the appropriate word from among frequently confused words (i.e., to/too/two, their/there/they’re, it/it’s, you/you’re, whose/who’s, which/that/who, accept/except, affect/effect, between/among, capitol/capital, principal/principle, stationary/stationery, who/whom, allusion/illusion, complement/compliment, cite/site/sight, counsel/council, coarse/course, farther/further, lose/loose, fewer/less, advice/advise, precede/proceed, adapt/adopt, eminent/imminent, assure/ensure/insure, allude/elude, elicit, illicit, discreet/discrete, censor/censure/sensor, conscience/conscious). SPI 3003.5.4Analyze cause/effect relationships in text. (What caused the Salem Witch Trials? What effect did this have on not only those involved, but on our country as well?)

Alternate Essay Assignment:
Wed:
8/22/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to one of the following:

Write about a time when...

ð You (or someone you observed) was on a "power trip."
ð You were frustrated by the blatant lies someone was telling and everyone was believing.
ð You sacrificed a principle that is important to you for a person that is important to you.
ð You (or someone you know) was asked to "name names" or implicate others in a problematic situation.
Vocabulary: Antonyms
Lesson:
The Crucible video; discuss essay requirements; must have at least 3 references from movie from today’s viewing. Teacher will make sure students are clear on essay requirements. Essays must be thoroughly thought out and not simply be a restatement of the play’s plot. All references must reflect back to the critical lenses statement.
Also, teacher will discuss inductive vs. deductive reasoning and apply to implications presented in play.
SPI 3003.5.7 Differentiate between the implied and stated evidence of a given argument.
("Your name, is it not white in the town?" What can we assume is being asked here? Also, what is being thought but not necessarily spoken by the townspeople?)
SPI 3003.5.8
Determine whether a given argument employs deductive or inductive reasoning.

Thurs:
8/23/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar (active vs.
passive voice)
Vocabulary: Choose ten vocabulary words and write a sentence for each.
Lesson: The Crucible video; must have a minimum of 6 total references from movie
SPI 3003.1.11 Correctly choose verb forms in terms of tense, voice (i.e., active and passive), and mood for continuity.
SPI 3003.1.5 Use previously learned techniques such as recognizing cognates, root words, affixes, foreign phrases, and textual context to identify unfamiliar words, including those specific to a particular content area.

Fri:
8/24/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to one of the following:

Write about a time when...

ð You pretended to be something or someone you are not.
ð You became totally disillusioned with someone or something that you believed in..
ð You were afraid to admit you were wrong.
ð You gave up something or someone important to you for a principle.
Lesson: Finish movie.
The Crucible Critical Lens Essay due at the beginning of class on Monday, August 27.
Discuss the following using socratic circle format:
What role did setting play in The Crucible?
How would things have been different
if the time period were modern day?
What was Arthur Miller's purpose in writing this play?
What was he trying to convey to his audience?
What elements on the play make it an allegory?
What do the characters' actions reveal about the mindset of the Puritans?
Why was it necessary for the play to end the way it did?
SPI 3003.8.4Identify and analyze how the author reveals character (i.e., what the author tells us, what the other characters say about him or her, what the character does, what the character says, what the character thinks).
SPI 3003.8.5
Identify the symbol of a literary passage and determine the theme it supports.
SPI 3003.8.6
Identify and analyze standard literary elements (i.e., archetype, allegory, parable, paradox, parody, satire, foreshadowing, flashback).
SPI 3003.8.7
Analyze the impact of setting on the mood and plot of a literary passage.

Week 4


Mon:
8/27/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Lesson #3 definitions
Lesson:
Olaudah Equiano, p160-164, question p165; compare/contrast w/ Frederick Douglass Captivity; notes on Frederick Douglass video; Adapted Reader pgs. 113-118; watch video w/viewing guide
SPI 3003.3.11: Determine the writer's purpose in a writing sample.SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU: 3003.8.14: Analyze works of literature as reflections of the historical period in which they were written.




Tues:
8/28/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: Synonyms
Lesson: Read Ben Franklin bio, Autobiography, & Poor Rickard’s Almanac (p 67-79). Discussion of Franklin’s Virtues & his aphorisms; w/clock partner, paraphase and present an aphorism & virtue; All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten p. 74.
SPI 3003.3.11: Determine the writer's purpose in a writing sample.SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.


Wed:
8/29/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Antonyms
Lesson: Discuss persuasive appeal. Watch video on ethos, pathos, logos and take notes.(http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=41007)

Read, paraphrase, and relate to Patrick Henry’s Speech to the Virginia Convention. Students will work in groups to complete this task. Each group will be given a section of the speech to analyze. After each group has paraphrased and discussed the section, they will present their answers to the class.

Honors Classes: Virtue and aphorism presentation; begin working on "Arriving at Relationship Perfection" project
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.
SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU 3003.5.11Identify and analyze persuasive devices that are used in written and oral communication (e.g., bandwagon, loaded words, testimonial, name-calling, plain folks, snob appeal, misuse of statistics, transfer, card stacking).


Thur:
8/30/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: Choose ten vocabulary words and write a sentence for each.
Lesson: Students will read Thomas Paine’s The Crisis and complete the analysis handout. Teacher lead discussion: Are Franklin’s virtues applicable to Paine’s and Henry’s speeches? (recognizing modes of persuasion)
Discuss logical fallacy. Watch Monty Python clip about "witch hunt".
http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?title=Monty_Python___Burn_the_Witch_&video_id=72357

HW: Write an essay in which you sum up the main points of Paine’s and/or Henry's essay. Then, identify the logical and emotional appeals he provides to support those points. (p. 95)
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.
SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU: 3003.5.10 Analyze and explain how a variety of logical arguments reach different and possibly conflicting conclusions on the same topic.


Fri:
8/31/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Read, interpret, and analyze Declaration of Independence. Analyze the use of repetition, charged words, parallelism, and loaded words. Determine types of persuasive appeal within the document (ethos, pathos, logos).

Personal Declaration: Using the format of the Declaration of Independence, create your own declaration of independence. This can be from anything you wish to declare your independence. Be creative and have fun with it!
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.
SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.

Week 5


Mon:
9/3/12
LABOR DAY: NO SCHOOL


Tues:
9/4/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar handout:subject/verb agreement
Vocabulary: Lesson #4 definitions

Lesson:
Review Patrick Henry's speech and discuss persuasive devices, techniques, & appeal
Teacher will discuss the reasons for the Revolutionary War and key figures during that time period. She will tell students the purpose for viewing The Patriot is to ensure that they fully grasp the reasons for the Revolutionary War and why the people involved felt so strongly about it. She will encourage students to answer the viewing guide questions as they watch the film. Also, students should analyze the hypocrisy of the so-called “rules of war”. Along with this, they should judge the necessity of beginning the war in the first place and the purpose for doing so. Students will begin viewing The Patriot with these questions in mind.
SSR for last 10 minutes of class.
SPI 3003.8.7: Analyze the
impact of setting on the mood and plot.

Wed:
9/5/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to prompt:
For what cause would you be willing to risk your life? Are some things worth dying for? Why or why not?
Vocabulary: Synonyms & antonyms for vocab words
Lesson: Students will continue to complete the viewing guide questions as they view the film. A brief class discussion the inevitability of war and what measures could have been taken for the Revolutionary War not to have occurred. Teacher will connect this with certain areas of students’ lives that end up in tragedy and what steps could have been taken for those tragedies not to have occurred.
SSR for last 10 minutes of class.
SPI 3003.8.7: Analyze the
impact of setting on the mood and plot.


Thurs:
9/6/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar (pronoun-antecedent agreement)
Vocabulary: Sentences
Lesson: Continue The Patriot; complete viewing guide questions
SSR: 10 minutes
SPI 3003.8.7: Analyze theimpact of setting on the mood and plot.

Fri:
9/7/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Finish movie; turn in viewing guide questions;
Unit assessment (Patrick Henry, Declaration of Independence, & Thomas Paine)
SPI 3003.8.7: Analyze the
impact of setting on the mood and plot.

Week 6



Mon:
9/10/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Complete freyer model for each of 10 SAT vocabulary words.
Lesson: Take Cornell Notes over p. 162-173 OR Romanticism PP notes1. Go over notes on Romanticism giving three main characteristicsof Romanticism in American literature.- description of nature- mention of past events- elements of supernatural2. Define imaging.Good readers don't just say words, they make mental images of words and scenes. This helps the brain to remember passages and events more easily. Practice doing this with the exposition of the story "The Devil and Tom Walker."1) Read the exposition aloud in class a section at a time.2) Make mental images of the settings described, of Tom Walker, of Tom's wife, and of the "Stranger."3) Now, record one of your mental images on paper. This is your homework assignment if not finished in class.
3003.8.16: Identify and analyze the use of literary elements, such as irony, archetype, allegory, parody, satire, parable, paradox, symbol, and foreshadowing.
CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed.)




Tues:
9/11/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar Ex.5 (pronoun-antecedent)
Vocabulary: Write synonyms for each of the 10 SAT vocabulary words.
Lesson: Review elements of Romantic Era and literature of the time period. Students will finish reading "The Devil and Tom Walker" and complete the Cornell Notes Anaysis Questions.
3003.8.16: Identify and analyze the use of literary elements, such as irony, archetype, allegory, parody, satire, parable, paradox, symbol, and foreshadowing.
CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed.)


Wed:
9/12/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: Write antonyms for each of the 10 SAT vocabulary words.
Lesson:
Teacher will review elements of Romantic Era literature. She will discuss symbolism and theme.
Class will then read "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
Teacher will encourage students to analyze the story for the following themes: secrets, sin, alienation, and guilt. Students will be expected to cite excerpts from the text to support each theme. Students will also answer the following questions:
Why do you think he was wearing the black veil?
What do you think the black veil symbolizes?
Why do you think Mr. Hooper will not remove the veil, even as he is dying?
What do Father Hooper's final words say about his possible reasoning for wearing the veil?
SSR for last 10 minutes of class.
SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude.
3003.8.16: Identify and analyze the use of literary elements, such as irony,archetype, allegory, parody, satire, parable, paradox, symbol, and
foreshadowing.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.



http://www.teachertube.com/members/viewVideo.php?video_id=190206&title=Fountain_of_
Thurs:
9/13/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar Ex. 6 (Adding detail to sentences.)
Vocabulary: Use each of the 10 SAT vocabulary words in a meaningful sentence.
Lesson:
Students will finish reading "The Minister's Black Veil". Students will discuss the Romantic Era elements present within the work along with Hawthorne’s purpose for writing the text. They will discuss the author’s life and determine what he wanted to tell his audience with this story. Students will connect Hawthorne’s work with the guilt he felt for his grandfather’s involvement in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692.
They will “get in the mind” of the author. For today’s assessment, students can
choose to either answer the critical analysis questions or create a “Mind Map” of Nathaniel Hawthorne.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Fri:
9/14/12
Bell Ringer:Respond to journal prompt. Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Read Dr. Heidegger's Experiment and complete questions and reading interpretation on handout.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Week 7


Mon: 9/17/12

Parent-Teacher Conferences



Tues:
9/18/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar: Combining sentences
Vocabulary: Lesson #5 definitions
Lesson:
Discuss Dr. Heidegger's Experiment and relate it to modern society's obsession with looking young (fountain of youth). Begin viewing Death Becomes Her. Students are to critically analyze visual effects, camera angle, close ups, etc.
Student will also analyze the mood of the film and determine setting’s effect on mood. As students view the movie, they will also take notes on a compare/contrast graphic organizer relating to thematic ideas present in both the story and the movie. This will serve as a framework for their compare/
contrast essay which will be written in class on Thursday.
SSR for last 10 minutes of class.
CC 11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account. CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Wed:
9/19/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to the following prompt:
Prompt: Why are Americans so obsessed with looking younger? With face lifts, tummy tucks, and liposuction, when is enough enough?
Vocabulary: synonyms & antonyms
Lesson:
Finish viewing Death Becomes Her. Compare/contrast Dr. Heidegger's Experiment w/ the movie.
Teacher will give students a compare/contrast formatting framework to assist them in structuring their essays. Teacher will also go over MLA format and in-text citation. Students will be required to adhere to these when writing their essays. With the students, teacher will review the writing rubric of which the essays will be assessed. Students will begin writing their essays in class, and the teacher will assist students with their introductory paragraphs. Students will write the rest of their essays outside of class.
CC 11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account. CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Thurs:
9/20/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar: Combining sentences
Vocabulary: Write meaningful sentences including each of the 10 SAT vocabulary words.
Lesson: Take notes from PP on Gothic literature.
Begin reading "The Fall of the House of Usher." Analyze intro paragraph for mood, tone, alliteration, diction, sentence structure.
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.


Fri:
9/21/12

Bell Ringer: Write in journal OR create cinquain poem (5 lines: Line 1/2 syllables, Line 2/4 syllables, Line 3/6 syllables, Line 4/8 syllables, Line 5/2 syllables)

Vocabulary: Assessment

Lesson: Read "The Haunted Palace" and complete poetry analysis.

Finish reading "The Fall of the House of Usher" and complete analysis questions. Complete questions as homework and turn in on Monday, Sept. 24th.


Honors Essay Assignment: Interpreting Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” Students and scholars from all over the world have attempted to analyze this famous short story. Dozens of different interpretations exist, but the most common five are listed below. Select the interpretation that you believe offers the best explanation of the story. Then find textual evidence from the story to support your interpretation. Be sure to include the page numbers where you found your evidence. Then explain how your evidence supports the interpretation you have chosen. The five most common interpretations of “The Fall of the House of Usher”: 1. Isolation: The mind and body of the Ushers have been destroyed due to their isolation from the rest of the world. 2. Conscious vs. Unconscious Mind: Roderick represents the conscious half of the mind; Madeline represents the unconscious half. Roderick (the conscious mind) tries to bury or deny the needs and desires of Madeline (the unconscious mind), but cannot. Ultimately the unconscious desires destroy the conscious. 3. Mind vs. Body: Roderick represents the mind; Madeline represents the body. Roderick tries to bury the body and the desires of the body, but cannot do this without also destroying himself—the mind. 4. Incest: Roderick and Madeline were guilty of incest. He buried her to try to escape his guilt, but his guilt destroys them both. 5. Autobiographical: Poe’s mind vs. Poe’s body; Poe’s conscious vs. Poe’s unconscious. Poe tries to deny his body (Madeline) and its needs, but cannot. Or Poe tries to deny the needs of his unconscious mind (Madeline), but cannot.

CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.


Week 8


Mon:
9/24/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Lesson #6-Complete freyers model graphic organizers for each of the 10 vocabulary words.
Lesson: Students will turn in Usher analysis questions. They will then choose one of the five interpretations of the story and find texual evidence to support their chosen theory. Students will work in pairs to find the texual evidence. However, they will write essays individually and include the texual evidence in their essays.

HW: Simplify, Simplify, Simplify (Due: Friday, 9/28/12)
Keep a three-column log for four days. In the left-hand column, note the time. In the middle column, describe your behavior and environment at that time. In the right-hand column, describe what if anything Thoreau might recommend you modify in your behavior or environment to keep it simple.
*You need to include at least 12 entries, with each entry consisting of a specific time, description of event, and 3-4 sentences describing how to modify your behavior.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)
CC11.RL.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.

Tues:
9/25/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to the following journal prompt:
Vocabulary: Write one synonym for each of the 10 SAT vocabulary words from Lesson #6.
Lesson: Transcendentalism Anticipation Guide
Students will take notes from Powerpoint
Using the following guided notetaking handout:
In groups, students will pretend to be like Thoreau and "live deliberately" at Walden Pond for 26 months. They are only only allowed to take 12 items with them. They must agree as a group as to what they will take and explain why. Also, the items must be grouped into at least three categories. Each group will present to the class their items, categories, and reasons for choosing each.

HW:
Read and paraphrase Henry David Thoeau's "Resistance to Civil Government."
CC11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CC11.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.


Wed:
9/26/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Students will read Thoreau's “Walden” and interpret the text. For each section, students will complete a double entry response in which they paraphrase the text and them then respond to the text in a meaningful way (question the author's style or content, give a deeper interpretation of the text, explain it's historical significance, etc.)
Transcendentalism in the Woods activity (if time allows). Students will take a nature walk and, keeping Thoreau in mind, will analyze the simplicity of the natural world. Students will choose one minute piece of nature such as ants, leaves, blades of grass, etc, and write a brief essay describing it and its significance.
Questions to Analyze (while reading Walden):
1. One of Thoreau’s desires was to simplify his life. Explain how you would simplify your own life, giving consideration to Thoreau’s meaning of “clutter.” Is simplification just a matter of renouncing possessions, or is it something more?
2. Discuss the changes in American society and culture brought on by the Industrial Revolution, and how those changes may have sent Thoreau running for the woods to commune with nature.
3. “To suck out the marrow of life” is a quote from Thoreau. Explain what is meant by this advice for living advocated by Thoreau.
4. Discuss the symbolism in Thoreau’s decision to retreat to Walden Pond on July 4th, 1845.
5. Analyze one of the six quotes displayed in Walden and debate its meaning. What does the quote reveal about Thoreau, and could the quote be applicable to modern life?
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.CC11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant. (e.g.in today’s lesson: Thoreau’s discussion about ants fighting in relation to his views about war, Thoreau’s excerpt about beans in relation to his feelings about nature and hard work, etc.)

Thur:
9/27/12
Bell Ringer: Choose one of Emerson’s aphorisms written below. Then, explain in detail what the aphorism means and how you can relate it or apply it to your own life.
Emerson’s Aphorisms
1. A friend might well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.
2. All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the absence of power.
3. Every man I meet is in some way my superior.
4. Hitch your wagon to a star.
5. Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.
6. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.
7. People only see what they are prepared to see.
8. The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.
9. The world is all gates, all opportunities, strings of tension waiting to be struck.
10. Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not.
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson:
Students will compare/contrast the writings of: Ghandi, Thoreau, and King. Lesson details are in document (mooreVissing_CivilDisobedience)
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC.11.L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Today's lesson plan:

Fri:
9/28/12
Bell Ringer:
Read the following speech and highlight areas that emphasize transcendentalist views:
Valedictorian Speech
Vocabulary: sentences & assessment
Lesson:
Students turn in their Simplify, Simplify, Simplify assignments and teacher will briefly discuss in whole class discussion format about the journals.
Begin watching Stranger Than Fiction. Give discussion/analysis questions to keep in mind while viewing film.
Stranger Than Fiction questions.
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CC.11.RIT.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
CC.11.L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.



Week 9



Mon:
10/1/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to Prompt
Vocabulary: Freyers models

Lesson: Review mid-term essay questions. Analyze excerpt from Emerson's "Self Reliance". Annotate text and discuss: imagery, theme, literary devices, and persuasive techniques.
Watch 15 minutes of Stranger Than Fiction.
SPI 3003.3.5 Use a variety of strategies to combine a simple set of sentences into a longer, more complex sentence. SPI 3003.3.6 Revise to correct a nonparallel construction.
SPI 3003.3.7 Select the thesis statement in a writing sample or passage.
CFU: 3003.3.21: Write to persuasive prompt
CFU: 3003.5.8: Logical Fallacy

Tues:
10/2/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: synonyms & antonyms
Lesson: Review for mid-term exam. Find text citations to support essay questions.
SPI 3003.3.1 Proofread a passage for correct punctuation, mechanics, and usage.SPI 3003.1.9 Proofread for errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Wed:
10/3/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to prompt
Lesson: Review for exam. Finish film.
SPI 3003.3.2 Choose the most effective order of sentences in a paragraph.SPI 3003.3.8 Choose the transitional device that appropriately connects sentences or paragraphs within a writing sample.

Thur:
10/4/12
Mid-Term Exams
SPI 3003.3.1 Proofread a passage for correct punctuation, mechanics, and usage.SPI 3003.1.9 Proofread for errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Fri:
10/5/12
Mid-Term Exams
CC11.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Week 10


Mon:
10/15/12
Bell Ringer: Read and Respond (Read Biology article on pg. 4 in The New York Times Upfront and write a 1/2 page response to article.)
Vocabulary: Complete freyer models for each of the 10 vocabulary words
Lesson: Intro to Realism (PP). Bum Rap Sheet activity for to introduce Mark Twain.
Read “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.”Origami frog activity.
11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement)



www.upfrontmagazine.com
Tues:
10/16/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Parallel Structure & Combining Sentences
Vocabulary: Using words in context
Lesson:
Background information: Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 and 1850. Mini lesson on satire and irony (verbal, situational, and dramatic).
Mini lesson on satire and irony (verbal, situational, and dramatic).
Begin reading Ch. 1 of Huck Finn. Analyze text for ironic elements, satire, and regional dialect. Intoduce students to "Satire Journal" and explain expectations.
(Click for online audio version of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: http://www.loudlit.org/works/hfinn.htm)
HW: Read Ch 1-6 in Huck Finn
11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement) 11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Wed:
10/17/12
Bell Ringer:Read and Respond (Read Sports article on pg. 5 in The New York Times Upfront and write a 1/2 page response to article.)
Vocabulary: Sentence completion.
Lesson: Reading check quiz for Ch. 1-6. Read Ch 7-9 of Huck Finn. Complete double entry journal for chapters.
Homework: Read Ch 7-10 of Huck Finn
11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement)
www.upfrontmagazine.com
Thur:
10/18/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Dangling Modifiers
Vocabulary: Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes/Inference
Lesson: Discuss Ch 7-10 of Huck Finn. What is Twain telling the audience about trickery? How can you relate the snake incident to the more overarching idea that sometimes seemingly harmless actions aren’t always so harmless?
SSR: Read Ch 11-12.
11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement)
11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Fri:
10/19/12
Bell Ringer:Read and Respond (Read Cover Story article on pgs. 6-7 in The New York Times Upfront and write a 1/2 page response to article.)
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson:
Seminar: How does Mark Twain address the issue of
slavery in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn? Use at least three pieces of
textual evidence to support an original thesis statement. Your teacher may give
you the opportunity to share your initial thoughts on the classroom blog in
order to get feedback from your classmates. (RL.11-12.6, W.11-12.2, W.11-12.9)
Homework: Read Ch 13-16 and complete the Chapter Review Assignment for chapters 1-16.
11.RL.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement) 11.W.2: Write informative/
explanatory text to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
www.upfrontmagazine.com
Week 11


Mon:
10/22/12
Bell Ringer: Read and Respond (National Story on pgs. 8-11)
Vocabulary: Complete freyer models for each of the 10 vocabulary words
Lesson: Huck Finn reading check quiz over chapters 15-18.
Students will turn in rough draft of Reading Journal Entry 1 about freedom.
Group Assignment: Analyzing text; supporting arguments with evidence
In non-homogenous groups, students will discuss a thematic based question provided by the teacher, find quotes from the text to support their answer, and present their findings to the class. (Questions given pertain to thematic and satirical elements found in Huck Finn, and each group will be assigned two chapters to analyze.)
Students will read Ch 19 in class either silently or aloud.
*This will be a two day activity.

www.upfrontmagazine.com
Tues:
10/23/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Parallel Structure
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson:Huck Finn
Huck Finn reading quiz over chapters 19-20. Teacher will conduct full class discussion about chapters 21-26, emphasizing satirical elements, author’s purpose, and thematic based incidents along with dialect and diction.
Assignment: Analyzing text; supporting arguments with evidence
In non-homogenous groups, students will discuss a given question, find quotes from the text to support their answer, and present their findings to the class. (Questions given pertain to thematic and satirical elements found in Huck Finn.)
CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed.)

Wed:
10/24/12
Bell Ringer: Read and Respond (Election 2012 pgs. 12-13)
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Huck Finn text analysis
CC11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g. where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed.)
www.upfrontmagazine.com
Thurs:
10/25/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Dangling Modifiers
Vocabulary: Complete sentences
Lesson: Huck Finn video analysis
CC.11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

Fri:
10/26/12
Bell Ringer: Read and Respond (Election 2012 pgs. 14-15))
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Huck Finn video analysis

CC.11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
www.upfrontmagazine.com
Week 12



This week's ACT vocabulary words:
adventitious, ambiguous, bona fide, cataclysm, deviate, edify, extenuate, fecund, glower, impale, importune, obfuscate, optimum, parochial, pedestrian
Mon:
10/29/12
Bell Ringer: Students will read the article, “Too Dumb for Complex Texts” and write a summary of the article in their bell ringer spirals.
Vocabulary: Complete freyer models for each of the 10 vocabulary words
Lesson: Students will turn in their reading journal entries as a final assessment grade for Huck Finn unit at beginning of class. Students will take a check reading quiz over final chapters of Huck Finn.
Teacher will have students read first three pages of Chapter 28 and consider Twain’s implications about women and their ability to think for themselves. (How does he satirize the popular notion that it’s a man’s world?) Students will find textual evidence to support this.
Students will finish watching the video version of the book.
(In observance of breast cancer awareness week, students will tie dye t shirts if time allows.)

Homework: Students will read “Desiree’s Baby” and answer analysis questions
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC.RL.11-12.6: Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
CC.11.RL.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
CC.11.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Quotes to Analyze:
Ch. 28: “Oh,” she says, “what am I thinking about!” she says, and set right down again. “Don’t mind what I said—please don’t—you won’t, now, will you?” Laying her silky hand on mine in that kind of a way that I said I would die first. “ I never thought, I was so stirred up,” she says; “now go on, and I won’t do so any more. You tell me what to do, and whatever you say I’ll do it” (Twain 188).
“Why, it’s because you ain’t one of these leather-face people. I don’t want no better book than what your face is. A body can set down and read it off like coarse print” (Twain 190).
“I’m going to do everything just as you’ve told me; and if I don’t ever see you again, I sha’n’t ever forget you, and I’ll think of you a many and a many time, and I’ll pray for you, too!” (Twain 191).
“Pray for me! I reackoned if she knowed me she’d take a job that was more nearer her size. But I bet she done it, just the same—she was just that kind. She had the grit to pray for Judus if she took the notion—there warn’t no back-down to her, I judge. You may say what you want to, but in my opinion she had more sand in her than any girl I ever see; in my opinion she was just full of sand. It sounds like flattery, but it ain’t no flattery. And when it comes to beauty—and goodness, too—she lays over them all….I’ve thought of her a many and a many a million times, and of her saying she would pray for me; and if ever I’d ‘a’ thought it would do any good for me to pray for her, blamed if I wouldn’t “a” done it or bust” (Twain 192).
Tues:
10/30/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Parallel Structure
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson:Teacher will explain the different forms of irony: verbal, situational, and dramatic.
Students will read Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” and keep the following statement in mind: Women in nineteenth-century America could not really be free.
They will also be asked to find one of each types of irony in the stories.
Students will then form and answer one question from each level of questioning that in some way relates to the following statement: Women in nineteenth-century America could not really be free.
HW: Students will read “The Yellow Wallpaper”, answer reading questions, and find three quotes from the text to support the essay topic about women’s freedom.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. CC.11.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CC.RL.11-12.6: Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g. satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).


Wed:
10/31/12
Bell Ringer: Students will provide a written response to the following quote by Eleanor Roosevelt: “A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong it is until it's in hot water.”
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Teacher will discuss homework reading and have students share some of the quotes they chose to possibly use in their essay.
Teacher will explain purpose of hook statements, thesis statements, and paragraph development. She will re-emphasize the three appeals in argumentative writing: ethos, pathos, logos and make sure students include these in their argumentative essays.
Students will practice writing various types of hook and thesis statements for their upcoming essay on women’s freedom.
First, each group will be given a different type of hook to form. They will then present their hook statements to the class. Then, they will form thesis statements, being sure that their claims are supported with textually based evidence.
http://r321persuasion-sp08.wikispaces.com/%2AContemporary+Persuasion
ethos, pathos, logos; logical fallacy; intro paragraphs: pre-writing, hook statements, and thesis statements;
(Upcoming essay: Write an argument in which they agree or disagree with the following statement, offering at least three pieces of evidence from the texts to support their position: Women in nineteenth-century America could not really be free.)
HW: Students will read “The Gettysburg Address” and annotate it, paying close attention to ethos, pathos, logos.
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CC.11.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CC.11.RIT.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text.
CC.11.RIT.8: Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g. U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g. The Federalist, presidential addresses).


Thurs:
11/1/12
Bell Ringer: Grammar-Dangling Modifiers
Vocabulary: Complete sentences
Lesson:
Students will listen to the Johnny Cash recording of “The Gettysburg Address”. Teacher will then review the Gettysburg Address homework and have students paraphrase the
first paragraph. Teacher will review the Says vs. Does” PP. Student will then answer the following questions in reference to what Lincoln is telling us about this new nation:
  1. What does Lincoln mean by “four score and seven years ago”? Who are “our fathers”?
  2. What does “conceived” mean?
  3. What does “proposition” mean?
  4. What is he saying is significant about America? Is he saying that no one has been free or equal before? So what is new?
  5. Summarize three ways in which the nation is now new, according to the text.
Students will then analyze how the meaning of the word “dedicate” changes over the course of the text, and what this reveals about the Gettysburg Address.
Students will be required to have at least one reference to the Gettysburg Address in their freedom essays. Teacher will assist students in finding quotes from the text to support their arguments.
CC.11.RIT.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.CC.11.RIT.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text.
CC.11.RIT.8: Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g. U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g. The Federalist, presidential addresses).


Fri:
11/2/12
Bell Ringer: Students will read a non-fiction, historical excerpt, and provide a written response to the text.
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Write an argument in which they agree or disagree with the following statement, offering at least three pieces of evidence from at least three of the texts read this week to support their position: Women in nineteenth-century America could not really be free.
Students will then peer edit each other’s essays, paying closing attention to hook statements, thesis statements, topic sentences, and the inclusion of textual evidence.
Students will then return essay to owner, they will review the emendations, and begin revisions.
Final drafts on Monday, 11/5/12.
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. CC.11.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Week 13



Mon:
11/5/12
Bell Ringer: Journal Prompt
Vocabulary: Definitions
Lesson: Students will peer edit each other's essays using the writing rubric. Students will then revise their essays as needed. (Focus: intro paragraph with effective thesis and hook)
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Tues:
11/6/12
Professional Development Day; NO STUDENTS


Wed:
11/7/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to visual prompt
Vocabulary: antonyms & synonyms
Lesson: Use "chunk paragraph development" handout to create body paragraphs on given prompt
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Thurs:
11/8/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to visual prompt
Vocabulary: Complete vocabulary sentences
Lesson: Analyze, annotate, and create questions for the "Gettysburg Address"
CC11.RL.1: Cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CC.11.RIT.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.

Fri:
11/9/12
Mock Writing Assessment for Mrs. Stafford's 3rd and 4th Block classes
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence

Week 14



This week's vocabulary words: bowdlerize, carnal, deference, ebullient, elegy, fop, impair, imprecation, nebulous, non sequitur, panegyric, pedantic, quandary, rakish, sanguine
Mon:
11/12/12
Bell Ringer: EOC prep questions
Vocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Intro to 1920s and The Great Gatsby; discuss the American Dream; Cornell Notes and higher order questions for intro section in textbook, pgs. 634-643. Review research paper guidelines and expectations.

Read and annotate Ch. 1 of The Great Gatsby (if time allows).
CC.11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
CC.11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth century foundational works of American literature.

Tues:
11/13/12
Bell Ringer: EOC prep questions
Vocabulary: synonyms & antonyms
Lesson: Read Chapters 2-3 of The Great Gatsby and complete 5 double entry journal entries for each chapter: 10 total entries.
CC.11.RL.3: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
CC.11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth century foundational works of American literature.

Wed:
11/14/12
School-Wide Mock Writing
Lesson: Watch movie version of The Great Gatsby in the little theater.
CC11.RL.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text (written text vs. movie version)

Thurs:
11/15/12
Bell Ringer: EOC prep questions
Vocabulary: Complete sentences for each
Lesson: Finish the movie and complete study guide questions.
CC.11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth century foundational works of American literature.

Fri:
11/16/12
Bell Ringer: EOC prep questions
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Read New York Times articles, write: title of article, six major points made in the article, and three key quotations from the article.
Use major points and quotes in outline of research paper. The outline is due before the end of class TODAY.
Research paper final draft is due Monday, November 26th.
Take the 1920s challenge:
http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/en/keys/games/18
CC.11.W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Week 15



Mon: 11/26/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: Write definitions to this weeks vocabulary words.
Lesson:
Teacher will introduce students to the concept of literature circles. She will review expectations, procedures, and roles. Teacher will then provide students with a list of novel titles from which to choose . Each student will indicate their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice. (This will not only allow the teacher to have final say in group creation, but will also ensure that student reads a book at their reading level.)
Teacher will then pass out lit circle group role sheets for students to review. The students will get in groups of five and determine who will take on each role in the lit group. The students will then read “A Rose for Emily” silently. After they have completed the reading, each group will complete the tasks for their designated role within the group.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Tues:
11/27/12
Bell Ringer: ACT Prep
Vocabulary: Determine synonyms for this week's vocabulary words.
Lesson: Teacher will review “A Rose for Emily” with students and make sure that each group completed their designated tasks within their groups. Students will then watch the video version of the story.
Afterwards, teacher will assign each student to a lit circle group and assign a novel to each student.
Students will then determine how many pages they will read each night in order to have the novel read by the two week deadline.
SSR for last 10 minutes of class.
CC.11.RL.9: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth century foundational works of American literature.

Wed:
11/28/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: Determine antonyms for this week's vocabulary words.
Lesson: Students will meet in their lit groups and complete their individual tasks. They will discuss last night’s reading and review the three significant quotes they chose to write about in their dialectical journals.
After students have completed their role sheets, they will determine who will perform each role for the next lit circle meeting.
Teacher will conference with individual students/groups to make sure they are grasping the material, working well within their groups, and working to their fullest potential.
SSR for the last 15 minutes of class.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Thurs:
11/29/12
Bell Ringer: ACT Prep
Vocabulary: Complete meaningful sentences with this week's vocabulary words.
Lesson: Students will meet in their lit groups and complete their individual tasks. They will discuss last night’s reading and review the three significant quotes they chose to write about in their dialectical journals.
After students have completed their role sheets, they will determine who will perform each role for the next lit circle meeting, making sure that each member is completing a different task than the previous day.
Students will complete/perform the “Save the Last Word for Me” reading comprehension strategy.
Teacher will conference with individual students/groups to make sure they are grasping the material, working well within their groups, and working to their fullest potential.
SSR for the last 15 minutes of class.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Fri:
11/30/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: Students will meet in their lit groups and complete their individual tasks. They will discuss last night’s reading and review the three significant quotes they chose to write about in their dialectical journals.
After students have completed their role sheets, they will determine who will perform each role for the next lit circle meeting.
Students will complete the “Somebody Wanted But So” activity within their groups.
Students will begin planning how they will present their novel to the rest of the class. They will keep in mind that their goal is to convince us to read their novel, so it must be persuasive.
Teacher will conference with individual students/groups to make sure they are grasping the material, working well within their groups, and working to their fullest potential.
SSR for the last 15 minutes of class.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Week 16



Mon:
12/3/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Tues:
12/4/12
Bell Ringer: EOC/ACT Prep
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Wed:
12/5/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Thurs:
12/6/12
Bell Ringer: EOP/ACT Prep
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Fri:
12/7/12
Bell Ringer: EOC Prep
Vocabulary: assessment
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Week 17



Mon:
12/10/12
Bell Ringer: Respond to prompt
Vocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Tues:
12/11/12
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Students will meet in literature circles and discuss novels. Students will rotate rolls on a daily basis. Teacher will conference with students and groups.
CC.11.SL.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Wed:
12/12/12
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Presentations
CC.11.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Thurs:
12/13/12
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Presentations
CC.11.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Fri:
12/14/12
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: assessment
Lesson: Presentations
CC.11.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Week 18



Mon:
12/17/12
FINAL EXAMS


Tues:
12/18/12
FINAL EXAMS


Wed:
12/19/12
1/2 Day of School
EXAM MAKE-UP DAY


Christmas Break December 20th -January 6th


Fri: 1/4/13
Curriculum Planning Day
TEACHERS ONLY


Mon:
1/7/13
1st Day of Semester 2
Students return to school







Date
Daily Activity/Assignments
State Standards
Links/Handouts/Notes/PP

Week 1



Mon:
1/7/13
Bell Ringer: Respond to journal prompt
(http://thisibelieve.org/essay/399/)
Vocabulary: Definitions
Lesson: Introductions; rules & procedures; intro to argumentative writing
SSR: 10 minutes

CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.


Tues:
1/8/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Intro paragraph development (pre-writing & thesis statements)
SSR: 10 minutes
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of s
ubstantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.

Wed:
1/9/13
Bell Ringer: Respond to journal prompt
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Intro paragraph development (hook statements)

SSR: 10 minutes
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.

Thurs:
1/10/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: body paragraph development, topic sentences, & transition
words (chunk paragraph development format)
SSR: 10 minutes
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.

Fri:
1/11/13
Bell Ringer: Respond to journal prompt
Vocabulary: assessment
Lesson: Argumentative essay #1
SSR: 10 minutes
CC.11.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.

Week 2


Mon:
1/14/13
Bell Ringer:Grammar: Parallel StructureVocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Peer edit essays
SSR: 10 minutes


Tues:
1/15/13
Bell Ringer: Respond to prompt in writing journal
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Choose clock partners. Get with 3 o'clock partner and create
argumentative essay to be presented to class. Must include a prop and
each partner must participate in presentation.
EARLY RELEASE FOR SNOW


Wed:
1/16/13
NO SCHOOL: SNOW DAY


Thurs:
1/17/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar: Dangling Modifiers
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Students continue to work on essays.


Fri:
1/1813
Bell Ringer: Respond to prompt (narrative writing)
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Students participate in "Organized Chaos" to categorize
vocabulary words, definitions, and visual interpretations of each
word. Students were then assessed on their understanding of the
words by completing a vocabulary assessment in which they determined
which words to use in a given paragraph.
Students then paired with their clock partners to finish writing their
arguments to be presented in class on Tuesday.


Week 3


Mon:
1/21/13
NO SCHOOL: MLK DAY


Tues:
1/22/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Students will present their arguments to the class while their
peers grade them for persuasiveness, appearance, oratory skills, and
effectiveness.


Wed:
1/23/13
Bell RInger: Respond to prompt
Vocabulary: synonyms and antonyms
Lesson: Discussion of the American Dream. Students will read articles
from New York Times to gain evidence for their American Dream essays.
Teacher will give a mini lesson on in-text citation and MLA format.
SSR:10 minutes


Thurs:
1/24/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Students completed outlines for their essays, revised thesis statements, and completed topic sentences for each supporting paragraph.


Fri:
1/25/13
NO SCHOOL: SNOW DAY!!!


Week 4


Mon:
1/28/13
Bell Ringer: Journal Writing
Vocabulary: Complete definitions portion of freyer model for this week's vocabulary words
Lesson: Go to library to type American dream essays.
SSR: 10 minutes


Tues:
1/29/13
Bell Ringer: Journal Writing
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Begin "A Class Debate in Multicultural Studies" lesson plan
Students will research Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. and prepare to rebuke or defend
each's vision on race relations.


Wed:
1/30/13
Bell Ringer: Journal Writing
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Continue researching for debate


Thurs:
1/31/13
Bell Ringer: Journal Writing
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Finish research and fine tune debate presentations, making sure to include ethical,
logical, and emotional appeal in their speeches.


Fri:
2/1/13
Bell Ringer: Journal Writing
Vocabulary: assessment
Lesson: Present debates


Week 5: TCAP Writing Assessment Monday-Wednesday


Mon:
2/4/13
Bell Ringer: Journal
Vocabulary: definitions
Lesson: Puritanism powerpoint notes. Read "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" and answered questions. Began reading Arthur Miller's The Crucible and received study guide.
HW: Finish reading Act I of The Crucible and answer study guide questions for Act I.



Tues:
2/5/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Act I reading quiz. Watch Act I. Begin reading Act II in class.
HW: Read "Half-Hanged Mary" and answer analysis questions.


Wed:
2/6/13
Bell Ringer: Journal writing
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Review Act II study guide questions. Watch movie version of Act II. Begin reading Act III.
HW: Read Act III.


Thurs:
2/7/13
Bell Ringer: Grammar
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson: Reading quiz over Act III. Watch the rest of the movie.
HW: complete study guide


Fri:
2/8/13
Bell Ringer: Journal
Vocabulary: Assessment
Lesson: The Crucible assessment
10 minutes of SSR


Week 6



Mon:
2/11/13
Parent-Teacher Conferences


Tues:
2/12/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: Definitions
Lesson: Watch Act 2 of The Crucible and answer study guide questions.


Wed:
2/13/13
Bell Ringer: SSRVocabulary: Antonyms & Synonyms
Lesson: Watch Act 3 of The Crucible and answer study guide questions.


Thurs:
2/14/13
Bell Ringer: SSRVocabulary: Sentences
Lesson: FInish watching The Crucible; complete quote analysis; review for exam.


Fri:
2/15/13
Bell Ringer: SSRLesson: The Crucible exam


Week 7



Mon:
2/18/13
NO SCHOOL
PRESIDENT'S DAY


Tues:
2/19/13
Bell Ringer: SSR/Journal Writing
Vocabulary: Definitions of Week 7 ACT words
Lesson: Begin Revolutionary Unit; take notes from PP covering time period, authors, literary changes, etc. Students will then anaylze Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virginia Convention". This will be completed as homework if student does not get finished in class.
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude. SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU 3003.5.11Identify and analyze persuasive devices that are used in written and oral communication (e.g., bandwagon, loaded words, testimonial, name-calling, plain folks, snob appeal, misuse of statistics, transfer, card stacking).




Wed:
2/20/13
Bell Ringer: SSR/Journal WritingVocabulary: synonyms & antonyms
Lesson: Students will analyze the persuasive appeals and rhetorical devices used in the Declaration of Independence.
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude. SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU 3003.5.11Identify and analyze persuasive devices that are used in written and oral communication (e.g., bandwagon, loaded words, testimonial, name-calling, plain folks, snob appeal, misuse of statistics, transfer, card stacking).

Thurs:
2/21/13
Bell Ringer: SSR/Journal Writing
Vocabulary: Create sentences using this week's ACT vocabulary words.
Lesson: Students will read Ben Franklin's Autobiography, Poor Richard's Almanac, and Robert Fulghum's "Everything I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten". Students will then analyze Franklin's aphorisms and determine meaning of each. They will then create their own aphorisms, draw a visual to represent their aphorisms, and display in classroom.
HW: Annotation of The Gettysburg Address.
SPI 3003.3.11: Determine the writer's purpose in a writing sample.SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU: 3003.8.14: Analyze works of literature as reflections of the historical period in which they were written.


Fri:
2/22/13
Bell Ringer: SSR/Journal Writing
Vocabulary: assessment for Weeks 6 & 7 vocabulary words.
Lesson: Weekly Common Assessment #2
Read and analyze Thomas Paine's speech "Common Sense".
HW: Read "The Fall of the House of Usher" and answer analysis questions ("Take-Home Quiz").
SPI 3003.3.11Determine the writer’s purpose in a writing sample. SPI 3003.3.12 Identify a statement that reveals the writer’s attitude. SPI 3003.5.11: Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.
SPI 3003.3.13: Identify the targeted audience for a selected passage.
CFU 3003.5.11Identify and analyze persuasive devices that are used in written and oral communication (e.g., bandwagon, loaded words, testimonial, name-calling, plain folks, snob appeal, misuse of statistics, transfer, card stacking).


Week 8



Mon:
2/25/13
Bell Ringer: SSR/Journal Writing
Vocabulary: Definitions
Lesson: Take notes over Romantica Era. Read Washington Irving's "The Devil and Tom Walker" and answer Cornell note-style questions.
HW: Read "The Minister's Black Veil".



Tues:
2/26/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: synonyms
Lesson: Begin reading The Scarlet Letter. Students will read "The Prison Door" chapter and be prepared to take a reading quiz over the reading.


Wed:
2/27/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: antonyms
Lesson: Read "The Mininister's Black Veil" and complete analysis questions. Then, create a found poem using words and phrases from the text.

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Thurs:
2/28/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Vocabulary: sentences
Lesson:
Begin reading The Scarlet Letter. Read "The Prison Door" chapter aloud. Discuss symbolism, author's purpose, and Romantic characteristics.


Fri:
3/1/13
Bell Ringer: Read aloud: "In Praise of the F Word"; brief class discussion over reading
Vocabulary: assessment
Lesson: Reviewed Chapters 2 and 3 of The Scarlet Letter.
3rd Block: Close reading of scene in Shawshank Redemption
4th Block: High order questions on Ch 2-3


Week 9


Mon:
3/4/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Lesson: Close reading of excerpts from Ch 1-5 of The Scarlet Letter.
HW: Read Chapters 6-10.


Tues:
3/5/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Lesson: Reading check quiz. Review Chapters 6-10 of The Scarlet Letter. Read chapters 11-12 in class.
HW: Read chapters 15-17.


Wed:
3/6/13
Bell Ringer: SSR
Lesson: Review HW chapters. Read/analyze chapters 18-19. Review for mid-term exam.
HW: Finish novel (chapters 20-24)


Thurs:
3/7/13
3rd and 4th Block Mid-Term Exams


Fri:
3/8/13
1st and 2nd Block Mid-Term Exams